What Is Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus? How to Use Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu) RT-PCR Detection Kit? - Vitrosens Biotechnology - Human and Animal Health Rapid Test Kits

What Is Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus? How to Use Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu) RT-PCR Detection Kit?

1 December 2023

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) virus, often simply referred to as H5N1, is a subtype of the influenza A virus that primarily affects birds [1]. It gained significant attention due to its potential to cause severe disease in both birds and humans. H5N1 is classified as a “highly pathogenic” virus because it can cause severe disease and high mortality rates in poultry populations. In this blog, we will delve in  Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu) and how to diagnose using with Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu) RT-PCR Detection Kit.

What Is Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A H5N1 Virus How to Use Avian Influenza A Virus Bird Flu RT PCR Detection Kitt

The virus was first identified in Scotland in 1959 in a wild duck. Since then, various strains of H5N1 have been identified in different parts of the world. The virus is commonly found in wild birds, particularly waterfowl, and can also infect domestic poultry such as chickens and turkeys [2]. It spreads through direct contact with infected birds or their droppings, as well as through contaminated feed, equipment, and clothing.

One of the most concerning aspects of H5N1 is its potential to infect humans. While human infections are relatively rare, they tend to be severe and have a high mortality rate. Human cases of H5N1 infection have been reported primarily through close contact with infected birds or their environments. However, sustained human-to-human transmission of H5N1 has been limited, which is a positive factor in preventing large-scale outbreaks in humans.

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A H5N1 virus

The potential for H5N1 to mutate and develop the ability for efficient human-to-human transmission is a significant concern. This could lead to a global pandemic if a highly transmissible strain emerges, as humans would have little to no immunity to such a virus.

Efforts to prevent the spread of H5N1 include culling infected birds, implementing strict biosecurity measures in poultry farms, and monitoring wild bird populations. Additionally, vaccines have been developed for both birds and humans to reduce the risk of infection and limit the severity of the disease.

Avian influenza A viruses can be divided into two categories based on their pathogenicity (ability to cause disease) in poultry:

 1. Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza (LPAI) viruses: These strains of avian influenza typically cause mild or asymptomatic infections in birds. They may lead to decreased egg production and mild respiratory symptoms [2]. LPAI viruses generally have limited impact on poultry populations and pose a lower risk to humans.

 2. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) viruses: These strains of avian influenza are more severe and can cause high mortality rates in poultry. They are associated with systemic infections and can lead to rapid outbreaks in poultry farms. HPAI viruses are of greater concern due to their potential to spread rapidly and cause significant economic losses in the poultry industry [3]. They can also pose a risk to human health, as some strains have the potential to infect and cause severe illness in humans.

What Are the Symptoms of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1)?

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) virus can cause a range of symptoms in birds and, in rare cases, in humans. The symptoms can vary depending on the species affected and the severity of the infection. In birds, especially poultry, the virus can cause severe illness with high mortality rates. In humans, H5N1 infections are relatively rare but can be severe and even fatal. Here are the typical symptoms associated with H5N1 infection in both birds and humans:

Symptoms in Birds:

  • Sudden onset of severe illness
  • Lethargy and depression
  • Loss of appetite
  • Respiratory signs such as coughing, sneezing, and nasal discharge
  • Swelling and discoloration of the head, neck, and eyes
  • Cyanosis (bluish color) of the wattles, comb, and legs due to poor oxygenation
  • Decreased egg production and abnormal eggs
  • High mortality rates, often occurring within a few days of infection
  • Neurological signs such as tremors and paralysis in some cases

Symptoms in Humans:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Muscle aches and joint pain
  • Severe respiratory symptoms, including difficulty breathing and shortness of breath
  • Pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea and vomiting
  • Multi-organ dysfunction
  • High mortality rate, with death often occurring within a few days of symptom onset in severe cases.

What Are the Symptoms of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A H5N1

Transmission of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1)

Bird-to-Bird Transmission: The virus primarily spreads among birds through direct contact with infected birds, their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces [1]. Contaminated feed, water, and equipment can also contribute to transmission within poultry populations.

Transmission Mechanism of Birdflu H5N1

Avian-to-Human Transmission: Human infections usually occur through direct contact with infected birds or their environments. Close exposure to live poultry markets or handling sick birds increases the risk. Although human-to-human transmission is rare, sporadic cases have been documented, often within close family contacts [4].

In Which Countries is the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus More Common?

HPAI A (H5N1) has been reported in multiple countries across Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. The prevalence of the virus varies, and sporadic outbreaks occur among both wild and domestic bird populations. Authorities worldwide have implemented efforts to monitor and control the virus, aiming to prevent its further spread and minimize its impact on both animal and human health.

Nowadays, in Europe especially in Finland, there is a new outbreak of HPAI A (H5N1). Besides the birds, the disease affected most of the farm animals including minks and foxes. Birds visiting the farm are thought to infect the furry animals by feed, water supply, faeces, or direct contact. In wild birds, black-headed gulls have been heavily affected, with mass deaths observed in many places, including in Finland. Scientist concerning about transmission through humans and take precautions like culling, vaccination, biosecurity and quarantine.

How Can I Protect Against the HPAI A (H5N1)?

Due to the potential economic and public health impact of HPAI A viruses, authorities implement several control measures:

  1. Surveillance: Regular monitoring of bird populations helps detect the virus early and prevent its spread.
  2. Culling: Infected bird populations are culled to prevent further transmission, but this can have economic implications.
  3. Biosecurity: Strict biosecurity protocols are enforced in farms and markets to prevent virus transmission.
  4. Vaccination: Vaccination of poultry populations is employed to reduce the risk of infection and transmission.
  5. Public Awareness: Educating the public, especially those in contact with birds, helps reduce the risk of human infections.

How Can I Protect Against the HPAI A H5N1

How to Diagnose the Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu)?

Diagnosing the Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu) involves a combination of methods to identify the virus in both avian and human populations. Scientists employ various techniques to confirm the presence of the virus, determine its subtype, and monitor its spread. Here’s an overview of the diagnostic methods:

  1. Clinical Signs and Epidemiological History:

In birds, the presence of specific clinical signs such as sudden high mortality rates, respiratory distress, swollen heads, and decreased egg production can suggest the possibility of avian influenza. In human cases, a history of contact with sick birds or bird environments, coupled with severe respiratory symptoms, can raise suspicion.

  1. Laboratory Testing for Birds:

Virus Isolation: Researchers collect samples, such as nasal swabs or feces, from birds and use them to isolate and culture the virus in a laboratory setting.

Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR): This molecular technique detects viral RNA in samples. It provides rapid and highly sensitive results for identifying the presence of avian influenza virus and determining its subtype.

Serological Testing: Collect blood samples from birds to detect the presence of specific antibodies against the avian influenza virus. This shows whether the virus has previously exposed the bird.

How to Diagnose the Avian Influenza A Virus Bird Flu

  1. Laboratory Testing for Humans:

Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR): Just like avian testing, healthcare professionals use RT-PCR to detect viral RNA in respiratory specimens from humans.

Serological Testing: Healthcare professionals test blood samples for the presence of antibodies against the avian influenza virus. This indicates past exposure to the virus.

Virus Isolation: In some cases, healthcare providers can culture the virus from respiratory specimens collected from humans.

  1. Genetic Sequencing and Subtyping:

Scientists use genetic sequencing to analyze the genetic material of the virus, aiding in determining its subtype and monitoring any changes in its genetic makeup. Subtyping is crucial for tracking the evolution of the virus and its potential to infect humans.

  1. Global Surveillance Networks:

International organizations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), collaborate to monitor and report avian influenza outbreaks. Global surveillance helps identify patterns, track the spread of the virus, and implement timely control measures.

Diagnosing the Avian Influenza A Virus involves a combination of clinical observation, laboratory testing, and genetic analysis. Rapid and accurate diagnosis is essential for controlling the spread of the virus and preventing its potential impact on both avian and human populations. Early detection, reporting, and collaboration between animal and human health sectors are key components of effective avian influenza management.

How to Use Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu) RT-PCR Detection Kit?

Using an Avian Influenza A Virus (Bird Flu) RT-PCR Detection Kit involves a series of steps to accurately identify the presence of the virus’s genetic material in a sample. RT-PCR (Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction) is a molecular technique that detects specific RNA sequences from the virus. Here’s a general guide on how to use the kit:

Materials Needed:

  • Avian Influenza A Virus RT-PCR Detection Kit
  • Personal protective equipment (gloves, lab coat, safety goggles)
  • Specimen collection swabs (nasal or throat swabs)
  • RNA extraction kit (if not included in the detection kit)
  • Thermocycler (PCR machine)
  • Consumables (microcentrifuge tubes, pipettes, pipette tips, etc.)

Procedure:

1.Sample Collection:

  • Collect samples from suspected infected birds following appropriate safety protocols.
  • Use sterile swabs to collect samples from the respiratory or oral cavities.

2.RNA Extraction (If Not Included in Detection Kit):

  • If the detection kit doesn’t include RNA extraction reagents, extract RNA using a suitable RNA extraction kit following the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Ensure the RNA is of high quality and free from contaminants.

3.Setting Up the Reaction:

  • Prepare a reaction mixture as per the kit’s instructions. This mixture typically includes a buffer, primers, probes, and enzymes required for the PCR reaction.
  • Include a positive control (with known positive RNA) and a negative control (no template) for validation.

4.Reverse Transcription (RT):

  • Perform reverse transcription if your RNA sample has not already been converted to complementary DNA (cDNA). This step converts RNA to cDNA, making it compatible with the PCR reaction.

5.PCR Amplification:

  • Place the prepared reaction mixture in the thermocycler. The thermocycler will cycle through different temperatures to facilitate DNA denaturation, primer annealing, and DNA extension.
  • The cycle includes repeated denaturation at high temperature, annealing of primers at lower temperature, and DNA extension at intermediate temperature.
6.Data Collection:
  • During PCR, a fluorophore bound to the probes emits fluorescence as amplification occurs.
  • The PCR machine records fluorescence data throughout the cycles.

7.Interpretation of Results:

  • The thermocycler’s software will analyze the fluorescence data.
  • Positive results show a characteristic fluorescence curve that corresponds to the amplification of target viral RNA.
  • Negative results show minimal or no fluorescence increase.

8.Verification:

  • You should further confirm positive samples through additional tests, such as sequencing, to verify the presence of the avian influenza A virus.

Using an Avian Influenza A Virus RT-PCR Detection Kit requires careful adherence to the manufacturer’s instructions, proper laboratory techniques, and biosecurity measures. The kit enables rapid and accurate detection of the virus’s genetic material, aiding in the identification and control of avian influenza outbreaks. Always follow best practices for biosafety and laboratory protocols to ensure accurate and safe results.

REFERENCES

[1] International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (2002). “46.0.1. Influenzavirus A”. Archived from the original on 2004-12-07. Retrieved 2006-04-17.

[2] Li, K., Guan, Y., Wang, J. et al. Genesis of a highly pathogenic and potentially pandemic H5N1 influenza virus in eastern Asia. Nature 430, 209–213 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature02746

[3] Ortiz JR, Katz MA, Mahmoud MN, et al. (December 2007). “Lack of evidence of avian-to-human transmission of avian influenza A (H5N1) virus among poultry workers, Kano, Nigeria, 2006”J Infect Dis196 (11): 1685–1691. doi:10.1086/522158.

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